Home Problems, What to do When You Can’t DIY? Here are Your Options

May 14 2019
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This article got me thinking about the problems I’ve run into here that either A: I couldn’t do or B: I didn’t WANT to do myself. Case and point: My VERY steep roof that needed to be shingled. I hired that one out! Yes, I could have done it but I really really really didn’t want to! The other main thing I hired out here was getting insulation sprayed in. I went with Spray Foam. It was a HUGE cost. If I had purchased fiberglass I would have put it in myself but I deducted that the cost was totally worth what I was getting in the end. No regrets!

This article mentions also taking a part an appliance. I’ve done that lol I did surgery on my dang dishwasher a couple of years ago and OMG that was so gross and I totally wouldn’t recommend it!

Before and after of my multi functional multi purpose entry and dining room that is also now doubling as my office and mudroom too! See how I transformed this space during a DIY do it yourself renovation, gutting my Grandma's 100 year old farmhouse and making it all new again!

When it comes to remodeling an old home or simply making changes to your current one, there’s no doubt that DIY is one of the best ways to go!

Between the limitless creativity, the ability to keep a project within your own budget, and all the learning and fun you have along the way, DIY is a no-brainer. However, there are some situations where, even if you’d like to, doing something yourself simply isn’t viable.

I love working on my home just as much as any DIY-er, but that doesn’t mean I’m always able to handle specific complicated issues. For example, remodeling a living room is great, but tearing apart, diagnosing, fixing, and reassembling a major appliance like a washing machine or dishwasher is an entirely separate animal.

So what about when there’s something you can’t DIY? Here’s what you need to know about finding the right people to take care of all your home’s needs with ease.

Finding the Right People

First things first — what are you looking for? If you’re an avid DIY pro, then chances are you won’t be looking for contractors very often. Rather than looking for someone else to overhaul that flooring, you’re likely only going to be seeking out help for specific issues beyond your scope of knowledge.

With that in mind, there are a couple of different options to consider. The first option is the obvious one: call a repair professional. When something happens to the dishwasher or your water heater ends up breaking down on you inexplicably, you’ll want someone who knows what they’re doing to fix the problems as soon as possible.

Before calling a company, consider doing some research. Sure, you can do a quick search for repair specialists near you, but you’ll want to look at how they’ve been rated in the past.

Sites like Angie’s List, Thumbtack, Facebook, and Google’s own review system all make it easier than ever to see what previous customers have to say about a company and the service they provide. Did they fix the problems they said they would? Did they have to be called back multiple times to redo a job that was incorrectly completed the first time? How did the interaction go? Those are the kinds of questions you’ll want to be finding the answers to.

Better yet, you can look to friends, family, and neighbors for personal recommendations. With how connected everyone is nowadays, you don’t even need to leave your house.

Join a community or neighborhood Facebook group and submit a post looking for suggestions from members who have had similar problems in the past and who they suggest calling — and avoiding. Slick slogans and nice graphics on a website are cool to look at, but you’ll learn a lot about a company by hearing what their past customers have to say about them.

Living with a whole house on demand hot water heater, how much it costs to run, how easy it is to install and what its like to live with, with well water.

Utilizing a Home Warranty 

Another alternative is locking in a service contract ahead of time. If you’ve just purchased a property recently, then a home warranty may have come with the house during the process. If that’s the case, then you need to know what a home warranty is and how you can best take advantage of one. These are service contracts with a specified time frame often included in the sale of a home so there’s a good chance you may already have one.

For those with a warranty, you’ll want to call up the service provider and find out what your options are since each plan is different. These service contracts tend to cover specific big appliances like that broken water heater and you may not have to worry about finding the right person because the provider has a list of approved contractors they’ll send out to your home.

As far as keeping costs down is concerned, it really depends on the situation and what a plan covers. In certain cases, you may be better off putting money aside in a savings account to handle an unexpected repair rather than paying an annual premium for a warranty.

But that there are also other benefits that come with a warranty like peace of mind and not having to personally vet service professionals in your area along with the added protection from major appliance breakdowns.

Whether you’ve already got a shortlist of preferred professionals, a home warranty that covers your non-DIY items, or nothing it at all, it’s never a bad time to start looking at your options for the future. The last thing you want to worry about if the AC goes out in 90+ degree weather is who you want to call; you just want it fixed quickly!

House Problems, what about when there’s something you can’t DIY? Here’s what you need to know about finding the right people to take care of your home

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