4 Houseplants That Improve Indoor Air Quality

Jun 15 2018
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One of my all time favorite projects is the hanging planter boxes I made for houseplants in my master bedroom windows. At the time I made them it was entirely because I had just survived a long gray winter and I needed something GREEN in my home. Since then those plants have grown considerably and never fail to brighten my day. One of the perks is also how GOOD they are for my whole home and air quality. The following is an article submitted to Grandma’s House DIY that I felt was really informative.

As homeowners, we want to do our best to make sure our house is as healthy as possible by removing chemicals from the air and improving our indoor air quality. According to Wellness Mama, indoor air quality is affected by many factors. Two of the biggest pollutants are formaldehyde and flame retardants, which are found in many products, furniture, and carpets. Pollutants from household cleaners and fragrances, as well as pollution from outside, can also linger in the air.

Creating healthy indoor air quality in your home has several great benefits such as lessening asthma and allergy symptoms. Coupled with properly maintaining your HVAC system and using air filters and purifiers, adding houseplants to your home can beautify your living spaces and help remove toxins from the air.

Peace Lily

One Green Planet cites a NASA study that reveals several of the 4 best houseplants to remove improve indoor air quality removing formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene. The peace lily is not only elegant and pretty, but it is also great at removing harmful pollutants from the air. 

Click on Image via Flickr by Kelly Hunter


One Green Planet cites a NASA study that reveals several of the best plants to remove three most common pollutants in the home: formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene. The peace lily is not only elegant and pretty, but it is also great at removing harmful pollutants from the air.

Peace lilies are known for being easy to care for. However, make sure to keep them away from children and pets and to wash your hands after handling them. The plants are mildly toxic.

Bamboo Palm

One Green Planet cites a NASA study that reveals several of the 4 best houseplants to remove improve indoor air quality removing formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene. The peace lily is not only elegant and pretty, but it is also great at removing harmful pollutants from the air. 

Click on image via Flickr by Starr Environmental

The bamboo is a popular office plant because it is a robust and low-maintenance plant. Not only is it rumored to bring good luck to its owners, but it’s also an attractive display plant. The bamboo palm filters out toxins and keeps the air moist, which is helpful during the dry winter months. The bamboo palm grows in single stalks, but often people will grow several together in a pot to create a fuller look.

English Ivy

One Green Planet cites a NASA study that reveals several of the 4 best houseplants to remove improve indoor air quality removing formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene. The peace lily is not only elegant and pretty, but it is also great at removing harmful pollutants from the air. 

Click on image via Flickr by Identity Photogr@phy

English ivy is mostly seen outdoors where it can be an invasive species that can cause damage to your home. When moved indoors, however, it is great at removing toxins from the air and can be used as a design element in your house.

English ivy can be used as a topiary or wrapped around a wine rack to create visual appeal. According to Rodale’s Organic Life, English ivy thrives best in part-sun and part-shade environments and is relatively easy to care for.

Chrysanthemum

One Green Planet cites a NASA study that reveals several of the 4 best houseplants to remove improve indoor air quality removing formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene. The peace lily is not only elegant and pretty, but it is also great at removing harmful pollutants from the air. 

Click on image via Flickr by Joe Shlabotnik

Another great dual-use plant to beautify and purify your home is the chrysanthemum, or “mum.” These popular, colorful flowers are easy to incorporate into your design element, and they are easy to care for as long as you have plenty of natural light available. They are best at removing toxins from plastics and paints, and they come in several colors from pure white to vibrant red.

In addition to adding some greenery to your home, change your HVAC system’s air filter according to manufacturer recommendations. Houseplants can give your air filter a boost to help with keeping the air inside your home as fresh as possible.

(This is a contributed post, for more information about my compensation please read my disclosure policy)

One Green Planet cites a NASA study that reveals several of the 4 best houseplants to remove improve indoor air quality removing formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene. The peace lily is not only elegant and pretty, but it is also great at removing harmful pollutants from the air. 

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4 Comments

  1. June 15, 2018 at 10:26 am

    This post is so informative. We can actually improve the indoor air quality with the right houseplants. All of these plants are beautiful yet useful.

    • June 18, 2018 at 10:00 am

      Thanks Stella I totally agree! I love all of my plants I have up in my master bedroom, helps with the winter blues too!

  2. June 17, 2018 at 8:10 am

    I love ivy but never knew it benefits. Love the idea of wrapping it around a wine rack. Thanks!

    • June 18, 2018 at 10:03 am

      Thanks for coming by Nancy! I love the ivy I have up in my master bedroom, helps with the winter blues too!

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