Patching and Painting the Former Workshop

Feb 18 2024
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Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood “wainscoting” in the workshop I knew the walls were going to be in awful shape. The extra outlets I pulled in here from Lodi’s room (for this space as a workshop) were no longer necessary so I snaked that line back out. Choosing to do that was me also being a little lazy because making them up to code (with the wainscoting now gone) would have been more work then just taking them out and patching the sheetrock.

There are already four outlets in here and another in the closet which is PLENTY.

My electrical inspector actually got a kick out of me. He was fully prepared to have to knock me for not adding enough outlets per code as I guess that’s pretty typical for a do it yourselfer.

I was an over achiever.

In fact I really thought about our outlet placement opting for outlets in corners as opposed to the center of every wall.

I’ve had to move way too many pieces of furniture to reach an outlet in my day!

With that done I assessed the damage which was considerable from years of this being my workshop. Not to mention I just HAD to glue all that wood up that I tore down leaving, as you can see, dozens of ripped out spots.

(I just realized I’m going to have to stop calling this a workshop pretty soon…)

The biggest issue was patching the back left corner.

This is a converted screened in porch… There are no studs like a normal wall and this corner is a perfect nightmare example.

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

I will have to use super long screws to go through the spray form and into the outside sheeting. I’m going to leave the little piece of sheetrock that’s there and just cover it with a piece that fits the whole corner.

After filling in the corner and a few other spots with spray foam I let it dry then shaved it down to wall depth.

(Tip on cutting spray foam: A serrated edge is the way to go so I used my little fine toothed wood saw but, in a pinch, even a steak knife would work lol.)

Fortunately we had some extra sheetrock in the garage so I cut a piece to fill the whole corner.

I scraped the walls down, making them as smooth as possible as prep.

After that I picked up a tub of sheetrock mud and got to patching.

I always opt for the lighter weight mud but it will crack if you use a lot at one time. (It has more water whipped into it than regular mud.)

First coat I put on heavy and then just kept adding and smoothing over a few days.

I’ve always sanded between coats but I didn’t want to have to seal up this room or deal with the resulting dust so I decided to try another method.

A warm water soaked paper towel rubbed over the edges to smooth the mud out instead of sanding… basically “mopping” the patches.

It, in fact, worked far better than sanding in every way and I’m not going to forget it! Sand paper can often leave a texture behind whereas this just left me with a smooth wall.

Of course it was impossible not to drip all over the place but at least this mess stays in this room and only goes on the floor which I needed to clean later anyway.

After several days of this I was quite ready to get on to painting. First I used a heavy weight oil based primer over all the patching. (I am in no way a pro at this and the thick primer really helped where my patching was far from perfect.)

I stuck with the same color scheme, Tomcat and Sail the Seas, by Valspar.

Paint darkens over time so I had to completely repaint every wall I patched.

After that I replaced and painted the missing trim as well as touch ups throughout the room.

What a big job!

I can finally get my office out of our dining room and back in here where it belongs.

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Patching walls with spray foam and sheetrock mud. With the decision to tear out all the wood "wainscoting" in

Comments

  1. February 20, 2024 at 8:34 pm

    Tarah, your method of smoothing out the mud instead of sanding between coats reminded me of a boatbuilder I was watching fiberglass the hull and using something called peel-ply to cut down on the sanding. Wonder if you could use peel-ply on sheetrock mud? As always, you amaze me with your work!

    • February 21, 2024 at 10:20 am

      I will definitely have to look into that Jean, I bet it would work great! This is the first time I did the “mopping” thing over sheetrock patches and I’m totally converted now, thanks for coming by!

  2. March 13, 2024 at 8:21 pm

    I agree, Painting is not as easy as I thought. I remember having to test the color so many times in different lighting and corners.

    • March 14, 2024 at 10:04 am

      Yeah people underestimate how big a job painting can be! Thank you for coming by!

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